RE: Toyota Land Cruiser | Spotted

RE: Toyota Land Cruiser | Spotted

Wednesday 14th August

Toyota Land Cruiser | Spotted

Who needs a six-figure car for the end of the world anyway?



On Monday we brought you news of the Rezvani Tank. Available with up to 1,000hp and options including thermal night vision, ballistic protection and electrified door handles, it claims to be "truly a vehicle for the apocalypse." Of course, if the end of the world really were nigh that would be the last thing you'd want; the only sensible choice in a desperate fight for survival would be the Toyota Land Cruiser.

So reliable is the Land Cruiser, the oft-told story goes, that at the time it was launched in Australia Land Rover claimed a 90 per cent market share; within a few years that had been eroded to just 2 per cent. Or perhaps that's more an illustration of just how shockingly unreliable the Brit turned out to be when driven upside down...


Nevertheless, future generations were widely regarded to offer, if not genuine Rezvani-style ballistic protection, then at least bulletproof operation of the metaphorical kind. So much so that while Japanese production of the 80 Series (of which today's Spotted is a member) ended in 1997, they kept producing it in Venezuela until 2008. That's a car which was first manufactured at the same time as the R32 GT-R, still being bought new by the time the R35 GT-R, which is still around today, came along. Remarkable.

So what's so great about it? Well, the 80 Series continued to offer the rugged, go-anywhere dependability of previous models, but with concessions to comfort and usability for the first time. Coils replaced the previous leaf-sprung setup, Panhard rods and anti-rolls bars improved stability and it had a far more refined cabin, replete with optional leather - it even became the first Land Cruiser to offer a leather-wrapped steering wheel.

The result was a model so popular that for the first six months after launch, the Toyota factory had to run around the clock to meet demand - this in an era before the popularity of the SUV had really taken off. Despite the changes, the 80 lost nothing in the way of off-road capability, as evidenced by its one-two finish in the 'unmodified production' class of the 1996 Dakar Rally.


You'll have to excuse the photos of today's Spotted, which are shockingly low-res even for PH. It's the quality of what the pixels display, rather than the quantity of them that you should be focussing on here, though. The example you see here is currently en route from Japan with a Super Lift suspension kit, Super Swamper tyres and a super-Japanese wide-body kit. As a 1992 car, it benefits from the 4.5-litre six-cylinder FZ engine which was introduced in that year; all 212hp and 275lb ft of torque likely required to rotate those enormous tyres.

Yes it's a bit silly, no it isn't really necessary, and sure, it flies slightly in the face of the Land Cruiser's no-nonsense approach. But it's hard not to find something appealing about this oversized JDM blast from the past. In case of an apocalypse, there's only one place we'd want to be.


SPECIFICATION - TOYOTA LAND CRUISER (FZJ80)
Engine: 4,477cc, six-cylinder
Transmission: four-speed auto, four-wheel drive
Power (hp): 212@4,600rpm
Torque (lb ft): 275@3,200rpm
CO2: N/A
MPG: N/A
First registered: 1992
Recorded mileage: 76,000
Price new: N/A
Yours for: £12,995

See the full ad here

Search for a Toyota Land Cruiser here

Author
Discussion

andy43

Original Poster:

6,178 posts

198 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
Yes it’s more than a bit silly. Buy a standard one then take it to Jonathan Ward at TLC for an LS conversion.

Walter Sobchak

4,575 posts

168 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
I’d love an 80 series some day but they’re getting pretty expensive now, I’d take mine in standard looking spec with the 4.2 TD.
The real best 4x4xfar.

Edited by Walter Sobchak on Wednesday 14th August 09:05

Dafuq

369 posts

114 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
I am sure it's a 'spotted' back in blighty but they are two a penny over here, love 'em...., all of them.

There is a well used and very true saying in Aus;

If you want to go into the outback, take a Land Rover, if you want to come back, take a Land Cruiser.

Never a truer word.

Bill

39,413 posts

199 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
Dafuq said:
I am sure it's a 'spotted' back in blighty but they are two a penny over here, love 'em...., all of them.

There is a tired old trope first used by Toyota marketing

If you want to go into the outback, take a Land Rover, if you want to come back, take a Land Cruiser.

Never a truer word.
EFA. smile

I had an 80 series, it was a bit bland and then it broke down. I can't say I gelled with it.

deadtom

1,284 posts

109 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
Dafuq said:
I am sure it's a 'spotted' back in blighty but they are two a penny over here
Not uncommon I’ll grant you, but two a penny? In anything resembling good condition These things are not even close to shed money. Even tatty ones are rarely shed money

loveice

468 posts

191 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
Wish we could have the proper Land Cruiser here in Europe (beside Russia). Ever since the last V8 Amazon, Toyota Europe has been trying so hard to convince us Prado is Land Cruiser, but it is not. Hopefully, when the 300 series is released, it will be officially re-introduced in Europe.

Cold

7,122 posts

34 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
Dafuq said:
I am sure it's a 'spotted' back in blighty but they are two a penny over here, love 'em...., all of them.

There is a well used and very true saying in Aus;

If you want to go into the outback, take a Land Rover, if you want to come back, take a Land Cruiser.

Never a truer word.
A well used saying? Surely it was nothing more than an advertiser's marketing slogan?

Sparky137

518 posts

125 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
That front bumper looks ridiculous and totally out of place. It would look far better with a proper heavy duty winch bumper. As it is it looks like its been built purely for show.

DrFeelAverage

34 posts

31 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
My parents have owned one of the last 80s, a 1998, since nearly new, and it's been a brilliant family workhorse. Barely broken in on 160k too, in black/flat black/rust with "tasteful" gold badging and grey leather/holes interior. My dad has half a mind to get it restored but it would probably lose its character.

Burnham

3,505 posts

203 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
Sparky137 said:
That front bumper looks ridiculous and totally out of place. It would look far better with a proper heavy duty winch bumper. As it is it looks like its been built purely for show.
Indeed, that would be the first thing removed if it were mine.

warch

1,485 posts

98 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
Cold said:
Dafuq said:
I am sure it's a 'spotted' back in blighty but they are two a penny over here, love 'em...., all of them.

There is a well used and very true saying in Aus;

If you want to go into the outback, take a Land Rover, if you want to come back, take a Land Cruiser.

Never a truer word.
A well used saying? Surely it was nothing more than an advertiser's marketing slogan?
Indeed it was. Land Cruisers are rare in the UK because it rains and they rust (badly). How many fifty, forty or even thirty year old Toyotas do you see over here? IIRC the Irish Army bought a batch of Toyotas in the 1970s, they nearly all rotted out due to the wet climate.

apm142001

34 posts

33 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
Always makes me laugh to see the 'bulletproof Toyota' myth perpetuated; the least reliable work vehicle I've ever used was a Toyota Hilux ('Invincible' spec, ironically)…

I'm sure they showed up Land Rover in past decades (not that that's ever been very difficult), but I suspect in the last 15 years or so they've been much on a par with most other makes.

Schermerhorn

3,575 posts

133 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
Amazon 100 series for me all day long. Just as capable and more civilised.

Walter Sobchak

4,575 posts

168 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
Schermerhorn said:
Amazon 100 series for me all day long. Just as capable and more civilised.
I’ve thought about getting a 100 series before they start getting expensive too, had a 120 series (Prado) until fairly recently and it was great, never went wrong, never got stuck off road and didn’t have any issue towing, it had done 165k when I sold it and drove really well.
The only thing that puts me off the 80 and 100 series slightly is they are really big, saw one a while ago parked next to a L322 Range Rover and it looked wider and longer.

rxtx

5,634 posts

154 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
I have a 100, it's not rusty yet. It is quite big, you can park fine but opening the doors afterwards might be a challenge. Don't even bother with 70s concrete car park multi-storeys though.

andy43

Original Poster:

6,178 posts

198 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
apm142001 said:
Always makes me laugh to see the 'bulletproof Toyota' myth perpetuated; the least reliable work vehicle I've ever used was a Toyota Hilux ('Invincible' spec, ironically)…

I'm sure they showed up Land Rover in past decades (not that that's ever been very difficult), but I suspect in the last 15 years or so they've been much on a par with most other makes.
You're probably right about the modern stuff, but the 80 was designed about 30 years ago... properly.
They're often called the last 'real' Landcruisers because they have the solid axles that people who like playing in mud insist are essential.
From the 100 series onwards they were all independent suspension, except for Australia where solid axles were still thought necessary.
Mine's a 1995 4.5 petrol, and when I win the lottery in a couple of hours time I will do this to it.. smile
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0mj7gdt6n4

mogman888

8 posts

106 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
Drove one around Madagascar a couple of years back. Unbelievably bad roads but the only vehicle that made the journey without problems.

pete.g

1,218 posts

150 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
I bought a 2003 120 with 138k on the clock in 2014 - now at 203k.

It has cost about 70% less per year to keep running than the LR Defender I ran from 2002-2011 and more importantly it has never left me sitting by the side of the road waiting to be recovered.

Yes- they do rust, but then so do Defenders.

llcoolmac

58 posts

44 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
apm142001 said:
Always makes me laugh to see the 'bulletproof Toyota' myth perpetuated; the least reliable work vehicle I've ever used was a Toyota Hilux ('Invincible' spec, ironically)…

I'm sure they showed up Land Rover in past decades (not that that's ever been very difficult), but I suspect in the last 15 years or so they've been much on a par with most other makes.
Myth? Yeah right. The land cruiser 80/100/200 were all designed with a 500,000 mile/25 year life span in mind. Ours is 2001 and has now racked up 485,000 very hard miles. Cars don't "fluke" their way to that sort of mileage without being designed for serious abuse. In fact I'd say it's one of the hardest worked landcruisers on the planet and we still haven't been able to break it. Usually it has a trailer of 2-4 tonnes behind it. Yes, the back door rusted badly and the two wings had to be replaced but underneath it is perfect. Well well rustprooded in the important areas. Aside from the fuel gauge packing it in and a faulty heater matrix almost everything else has been incredibly reliable. I'm sure there have been little things here and there but with that mileage is there anything else that would have done that much work? It still doesn't use a single drop off oil between services and is in all its original suspension components. I can't think of a single other vehicle on the road capable of that. I'm sure it would have required at least two Range Rovers and a whole heap of maintenance to do the same amount of work.

We had an 80 series beforehand and while I prefer the look of the 80, the 100 is in a different league as a work vehicle. Everything about it was improved.

Edited by llcoolmac on Wednesday 14th August 19:34


Edited by llcoolmac on Wednesday 14th August 19:35

apm142001

34 posts

33 months

Wednesday 14th August
quotequote all
llcoolmac said:
Myth? Yeah right. The land cruiser 80/100/200 were all designed with a 500,000 mile/25 year life span in mind. Ours is 2001 and has now racked up 485,000 very hard miles. Cars don't "fluke" their way to that sort of mileage without being designed for serious abuse. In fact I'd say it's one of the hardest worked landcruisers on the planet and we still haven't been able to break it. Usually it has a trailer of 2-4 tonnes behind it. Yes, the back door rusted badly and the two wings had to be replaced but underneath it is perfect. Well well rustprooded in the important areas. Aside from the fuel gauge packing it in and a faulty heater matrix almost everything else has been incredibly reliable. I'm sure there have been little things here and there but with that mileage is there anything else that would have done that much work? It still doesn't use a single drop off oil between services and is in all its original suspension components. I can't think of a single other vehicle on the road capable of that. I'm sure it would have required at least two Range Rovers and a whole heap of maintenance to do the same amount of work.

We had an 80 series beforehand and while I prefer the look of the 80, the 100 is in a different league as a work vehicle. Everything about it was improved.

Edited by llcoolmac on Wednesday 14th August 19:34


Edited by llcoolmac on Wednesday 14th August 19:35
Succinct. But as mentioned, I was referring to more modern stuff - the example you mention is from 2001. From the sounds of what andy43 says (who clearly knows landcruisers better than I) it was quite believable back then, but for more recent vehicles I would definitely stand by ‘myth’...as I say, the mid 00s-onwards Hilux has been pretty flaky in my experience (and said experience covers a number of fairly new, well-maintained ones).